News - Archives

Tony DeLap, pioneering West Coast figure in abstract art, dies at 91

Via Los Angeles Time, June 1, 2019

"Tony DeLap, the Orange County artist who helped to define West Coast minimalism through his meticulous exploration of the intersection of sculpture and painting, has died. He was 91.

DeLap died Wednesday at his home in Corona del Mar, said his studio assistant and archivist, Robin Johnson..."


Read More: Tony DeLap, pioneering West Coast figure in abstract art, dies at 91

What They Found: Our Contributors Share Their 2018 Discoveries

"Ashley Clark, film programmer and critic

In March, acting on a recommendation from the website Screen Slate—an increasingly essential resource in this rep coverage–starved age—I took myself to Manhattan’s Electronic Arts Intermix to see a shorts program by a grandly named video and performance artist whose work had hitherto escaped my notice: Ulysses S. Jenkins. The L.A.-based Jenkins was an early adopter of consumer-grade video cameras and used this emergent technology to conjure idiosyncratic portraits of African-American life that challenged dominant—that is to say largely racist and reductive—depictions. “Idiosyncratic,” it must be said, barely begins to describe the pick of the program, Two-Zone Transfer (1979), a discombobulating fever dream starring Jenkins and friends (including artist Kerry James Marshall), and involving blackface and minstrel imagery, hideous rubber masks (Richard Nixon!), religious preaching, an indefatigable smoke machine, and


Read More: What They Found: Our Contributors Share Their 2018 Discoveries

All Hands on Deck for Boat Building

by Gustavo Arellano, Alta

With his proto-Fu Manchu mustache, bright eyes, salt-and-pepper hair, sporty brown vest and Australian accent, Simon Penny seems like he should be a BBC documentarian.

But he’s actually a UC Irvine professor. And a boatbuilder. And the boat he’s building is not just some pleasure craft.

For the past two years, Penny has been constructing — from scratch — a modern-day version of a proa, the Micronesian outrigger boat renowned in the sailing world for its dexterity and speed.

“To call them ‘canoes’ is a misnomer,” Penny says excitedly. “We’re not talking a kayak here. It’s the craft that humans explored a third of the planet in. We forget this. The colonial narrative is that the Micronesians just were blown to other islands. But they knew where they were going. These are humans, right?”

He has named the boat Orthogonal, and he describes the project as “a case study in decolonialized, sustainable design practice.”

The


Read More: All Hands on Deck for Boat Building

Simone Forti receives the Claire Trevor School of the Arts Lifetime Achievement Award

MEDIA ADVISORY

Simone Forti receives the Claire Trevor School of the Arts Lifetime Achievement Award

EVENT:
The Art of Performance in Irvine: Simone Forti and Friends

WHEN/WHERE:
7:00 p.m. Thursday, November 1, 2018, Experimental Media Performance Lab (xMPL) at the Claire Trevor School of the Arts.
Mesa Parking Structure (4002 Mesa Road, Irvine, CA 92617)

INFORMATION:
Media planning to attend should contact Jaime DeJong at 949-824-2189 or jdejong@uci.edu. Attendance and parking are complimentary for media who RSVP in advance.

HIGHLIGHTS:
earlier in the day - 12:00 p.m. Movement workshop with Simone Forti for UCI Students
7:00 p.m. Performances and award ceremony

BACKGROUND: 
An evening of performance and short films celebrating the life and work of dancer/artist


Read More: Simone Forti receives the Claire Trevor School of the Arts Lifetime Achievement Award

Charles White’s Students on Why They—and the Art World—Wouldn’t Be the Same Without His Work

"But his impact extended beyond what White as an individual made himself. White was an instructor at the Otis Art Institute, where he taught a number of artists who have not only made names for themselves—in some instances, by continuing to work with the themes that White pioneered—but who now regularly break records at auction. Among them are megastars David Hammons and Kerry James Marshall, performance and video artist Ulysses Jenkins, and L.A.-based muralists Richard Wyatt Jr. and Judithe Hernández. All credit White with an undeniable influence on their work and life."


Read More: Charles White’s Students on Why They—and the Art World—Wouldn’t Be the Same Without His Work

Pages