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Laguna Art Museum’s centennial honors artist Tony DeLap

Just as DeLap’s art influenced and inspired new generations of younger artists, so too did his efforts in the classroom. DeLap taught and mentored some of today’s most notable contemporary artists, including Bruce Nauman, John McCracken and James Turrell. But while he pioneered art forms and founded a major artist community at UC Irvine, he never sought out the same level of attention as some of his contemporaries. For him, teaching, creation and experimentation were enough.

 


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Ken Gonzales-Day, MFA 1993, "Unseen: Our Past in New Light: Ken Gonzales-Day and Tituts Kaphar" exhibition at National Portrait Gallery

Ken Gonzales-Day, MFA 1993, is in a major 2-person exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery , "UnSeen: Our Past in a New Light: Ken Gonzales-Day and Titus Kaphar." The exhibition will be on view from Friday, March 23, 2018 through January 6, 2019.

As the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery marks its 50th anniversary, it will not only honor the past with special exhibitions but also shape the museum's next chapter. The first contemporary exhibition of the museum's anniversary season, "UnSeen: Our Past in a New Light: Ken Gonzales-Day and Titus Kaphar" examines how people of color are missing in historical portraiture, and how their contributions to the nation's past were rendered equally invisible. Focused around two contemporary artists, Ken Gonzales-Day and Titus Kaphar, the exhibition brings to the forefront African Americans, Native Americans and Latino Americans to amend America's historical narrative. Reworking traditional art presentations, Gonzales-Day and


Read More: Ken Gonzales-Day, MFA 1993, "Unseen: Our Past in New Light: Ken Gonzales-Day and Tituts Kaphar" exhibition at National Portrait Gallery

The Art Department congratulates Liat Yossifor, MFA 2002, on the exhibition of her most recent paintings

The Art Department congratulates Liat Yossifor, MFA 2002, on the exhibition of her most recent paintings at Miles McEnery Gallery, opening in New York on Saturday, March 17. The exhibition will run from March 17 - April 14. 

In 2011, Liat Yossifor definitively turned her painting practice toward abstraction, and has since been making works that adhere to a specific formal approach. Limiting herself to three days to complete a painting, the time pressure turns into a kind of psychological pressure. In this way, her work becomes a self-conscious performance. Yossifor chases an elusive composition around the canvas, though she does not seek to achieve a composition that is thoroughly “resolved.” Her struggle to locate something creates contradictory forces that simultaneously push and pull the viewer.

The resulting monochromatic paintings are equally pictorial and physical. Using an alla prima (“at first attempt”) technique, Yossifor works within the durational


Read More: The Art Department congratulates Liat Yossifor, MFA 2002, on the exhibition of her most recent paintings

Hong-An Truong MFA interviewed in Artforum about her recent work

Hương Ngô and Hồng-Ân Trương’s (MFA) work The Opposite of Looking is Not Invisibility. The Opposite of Yellow is Not Gold, 2016, pairs vernacular photographs of the artists’ mothers with texts from 1970s-era US congressional hearings regarding Vietnamese refugees. It is featured in “Being: New Photography 2018,” which will be on view at the Museum of Modern Art in New York from March 18 to August 19, 2018. Here, the artists discuss the political and personal impetuses behind their approach and how race, gender, and labor are often made invisible in cultural narratives.

Excerpts from an interview with Huong Ngo and Hong-An Truong


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Alum James Luna (1950-2018)

James Luna (BA 1977) passed away on March 3. He was a highly influential Native American performance artist with an international reputation.

"Luna has had more than forty solo shows and participated in eighty-five group exhibitions. His work was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, the New Museum, and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Contemporary Native Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico; and the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, Ontario; among other institutions. He was also the recipient of numerous awards, including a fellowship from the Guggenheim Foundation in 2017; a grant from Art Matters in 2014; an honorary Ph.D. from Santa Fe’s Institute of American Indian Arts in 2011; a Distinguished Visiting Faculty Award from the University of California, Davis, in 1994; and a Bessie Creator Award from the New York Dance Theatre Workshop in 1991."


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Alumni and Faculty to be featured in Made in LA 2018 at the Hammer Museum

Opening June 3, Made in LA 2018, the Hammer Museum’s biennial survey exhibition of recent artwork from Southern Californian artists, is featuring two UCI alumni- Linda Stark (MFA 1985) and Alison O’Daniel (MFA 2010)- and one current UCI professor- Daniel Joseph Martinez- amongst its roster of 32 participating artists. 

 


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The ambiguities of Daniel Joseph Martinez’s blunt statements.

"Not so much the imagery but the title of Daniel Joseph Martinez’s recent exhibition at the Roberts & Tilton gallery (newly renamed Roberts Projects) in Culver City, California, led me to wonder about that sense of identification between a male artist and his female subject that Flaubert and Williams are supposed to exemplify—although in the case of Martinez, the subject is not fictional but a historical personage. The exhibition was called “I am Ulrike Meinhof or (someone once told me time is a flat circle).” Leaving aside for a moment the show’s more obviously riddling subtitle, what could Martinez mean by his “Ulrike Meinhof, c’est moi”? It would be wise not to answer too quickly: Martinez has a history of hanging his work on blunt first-person statements that get more ambiguous the closer you look at them. One of them has kept me pondering for almost 25 years."


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'Urban Light': Everything you didn't know about L.A.'s beloved landmark

The artwork, one of the city's most popular landmarks, turns 10 this month. To mark its first decade, the museum has switched from incandescent light bulbs to LEDs, a birthday gift from the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation.

It’s something that the late Burden’s wife, Nancy Rubins, said would have pleased the artist.

“Chris was a super proponent of the environment and that LEDs can be found, now, to the exact same light and intensity and color and tone that the initial light bulbs gave off, I think it would be marvelous for him,” she said. “Because that’s what drew him to the piece. It was light.”


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Daniel Joseph Martinez has been selected for the Vancouver Biennale

Professor Daniel Joseph Martinez has been selected to be featured at the Vancouver Biennale in July.


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Professor Daniel Joseph Martinez has been selected for the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Residency

Professor Daniel Joseph Martinez has been selected for the very prestigious Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Residency for the summer. He will begin new projects in Italy.


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